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My own recordings are self-produced and reflect my love of couple dance music from many parts of the world, from different traditions and time periods. All pieces are meant for both dancing and listening and are chosen for their special beauty, passion, and evocativeness. Musicians whom I’ve worked with over the years play on these albums with the result that there are delightful and varied arrangements, rich instrumentation, as well as stellar musicianship throughout.

BETWEEN TWO WORLDS

cd cover: between two worlds

16 Romantic Dances from the Americas

Mary Lea and Friends

  1. Quebra Queixo: (Brazilian choro)
  2. Capriccio Irreale: (waltz)
  3. Agradecendo: (Brazilian choro waltz)
  4. San Rafael: (Venezuelan waltz)
  5. Aria 2 from Partita #2 in G: (waltz)
  6. Piazza Vittorio: (Brazilian choro)
  7. Flor de Canela: (Mexican waltz)
  8. El Sueño de la Muñequita: (Paraguayan waltz)
  9. El Apache Argentino: (Argentinian waltz)
  10. Fulanita / Panchita: (Mexican waltzes)
  11. Paçoca: (Brazilian choro)
  12. Middle of the Night (waltz)
  13. Vou Vivendo: (Brazilian choro)
  14. Dininha: (Brazilian choro waltz)
  15. Por una Cabeza: (Argentinian tango)
  16. Stepping Stones (English country dance waltz)

Listen to mp3 samples by choosing from the links above

BETWEEN TWO WORLDS reflects my love for music from South America, choros from Brazil, Argentinian tangos, waltzes from Mexico, Paraguay and Venezuela. On this recording as well are some very special original waltzes by Peter Barnes and dance tunes from other sources.

Musicians:

Mary Lea
violin, viola
Peter Barnes
piano
Lise Brown
flute
John Chapin
French horn
Ralph Gordon
bass
Steve Leicach
percussion
Jeremiah McLane
accordion
Keith Murphy
guitar
Jessica Murrow
oboe
Anna Patton
clarinet
Steve Procter
guitar
Jacqueline Schwab
piano

What do they say about this recording??

“…the piano on “San Rafael” is a perfect example of great waltz music for dancing. I’m not only talking about Peter’s energetic playing, but the instrument itself as well. That was a great piano for dance music. And you added driving guitars to some other tracks to provide the energy to drive a roomful of dancers…Lots of contrast on one CD.” –Richard Powers, Professor of Dance, Stanford CA